Bomberman 64

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Bomberman 64, known in Japan as Baku Bomberman (爆ボンバーマン Baku Bonbāman, “Explosive Bomberman”), is a video game developed by Hudson Soft, published by Hudson Soft in Japan and published by Nintendo in North America and Europe for the Nintendo 64. The game was released in Europe on November 27, 1997 and released in North America three days later. While the game never saw a release on the Wii’s Virtual Console service, it was eventually released on the Wii U Virtual Console in both Europe and North America in March 2017 followed by Japan in July 2017.

Bomberman 64 is the first 3D game within the Bomberman series. It implements a different single-player mode by incorporating action-adventure and platforming stages instead of arenas in which enemies or other elements must be destroyed.

It spawned 3 more games on the Nintendo 64Bomberman Hero (1998), Bomberman 64: The Second Attack (2000), and Bomberman 64 (2001).

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